Tuesday, 18 March 2014

The Canadian Rangers: A Living History


The Canadian Rangers stand sentinel in the farthest reaches of our country. For six decades, this dedicated group of citizen-soldiers has quietly served as Canada’s eyes, ears, and voice in isolated coastal and northern communities.

How does this minimally trained and lightly equipped force make a meaningful contribution to national defense and to sustainable communities? One of Canada’s leading experts on northern issues answers this question using official records, extensive interviews, and on-the-ground participation in Ranger exercises from coast to coast to coast. Lackenbauer reveals how the Rangers have evolved into a flexible, inexpensive, and culturally inclusive way for Canada to "show the flag." The Rangers offer living proof that military activities designed to assert sovereignty need not cause insecurity for residents of remote regions. Local knowledge, stewardship, and national security prove compatible and mutually reinforcing.

The Canadian Rangers also tells the untold story of a successful partnership that has developed between the Canadian Forces and Aboriginal peoples, a partnership rooted in traditional knowledge and skills and characterized by acceptance and cross cultural understanding.

It was researchered and written by Dr Whitney Lackenbauer a professor in the Dept of History at St Jerome University.


https://archive.org/details/LackenbauwerRangerAndCandianMilitaryMixdown 



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